Archaeological sites

Aereal view of Orongo
Ahu Nau Nau at dawn
Traveller Moai near Ahu Tongariki
Ahu Te Pito Kura
Ahu Akahanga
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We could say that Easter Island is a huge open-air museum. Archaeological sites are scattered throughout the island, and they give an idea of what their culture was like, the development achieved when sculpting the stone to create the huge moai with its gigantic ceremonial platforms and the beliefs that their organization was based on. Discovering these places is quite a fascinating adventure worth living without haste.

However, Easter Island archaeology is not limited to the moai, but includes ceremonial altars, remains of ancient tombs of chiefs and important people that were buried according to Rapa Nui traditional religious rites, ceremonial caves, petroglyphs and more.




Due to the abundance of archaeological remains and the special geographical situation of the Easter Island, which has favored the island keeps still pretty virgin (very few visitors it receives), in many cases it is possible to tour the archaeological sites alone. An experience that leaves no one indifferent.

Main archaeological sites

Orongo Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Orongo Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Orongo

The ceremonial village of Orongo, a Rapa Nui word that means “The Call”, is majestically nestled on a narrow strip of about 250 meters, between the edge of the Rano Kau crater and a 300 meter cliff. Read more…


Ahu Tahai Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Ahu Tahai Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Ahu Tahai

Tahai is the generic name given to this complex, which once consisted of a village with three Rapa Nui ceremonial platforms, and currently is the largest and best restored archaeological site near Hanga Roa. Read more…


Ahu Akivi Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Ahu Akivi Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Ahu Akivi

The first excavation and full restoration jobs of a ceremonial platform in Easter Island were performed in Ahu Akivi ​​by the American archaeologist, William Mulloy, and the Chilean, Gonzalo Figueroa. Read more…


Ahu Tongariki Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Ahu Tongariki Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Ahu Tongariki

Located in Hanga Nui, on the southeast coast of Easter Island and just 2 kilometers from the Rano Raraku quarry, Ahu Tongariki is the most majestic ceremonial platform on the whole island. Read more…


Ahu Nau Nau Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Ahu Nau Nau Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Ahu Nau Nau

Ahu Nau Nau is symbolically one of the most important ahus on Easter Island as it is located on the beautiful beach of Anakena, the place where, as the story goes, King Hotu Matu’a first landed to populate the island. Read more…


Ahu Akahanga Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Ahu Akahanga Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Ahu Akahanga

Ahu Akahanga is a ceremonial platform located on the south coast of the island. This platform is 18 meters long, has not been restored, and allows you to see the state in which the island was found by the first European explorers. Read more…


Ahu Hanga Te'e Vaihu Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Ahu Hanga Te'e Vaihu Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Ahu Hanga Te’e Vaihu

Vaihu is one of the places where Easter Island’s isolation is most strongly felt. Framed by cliffs where the ocean waves strongly break and shape the landscape, the Hanga Te’e Bay has a stunning appearance. Read more…


Ahu Te Peu Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Ahu Te Peu Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Ahu Te Peu

The area of ​​Ahu Te Peu is nestled in a fascinating landscape along the cliffs, which very few visitors go to, so the feeling of loneliness and isolation is overwhelming. Read more…


Ahu Huri a Urenga Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Ahu Huri a Urenga Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Ahu Huri a Urenga

Although most ceremonial platforms and their respective moai are found along the coast, there were also inland villages with ahus, especially in the agricultural regions. Read more…


Hanga Kio’e Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Hanga Kio’e Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Hanga Kio’e

Hanga Kio’e means “Mouse Bay”. This is due to an old legend which tells of a widow that walked in the bay with a mouse in her mouth, a sign of mourning for the death of her husband, whose remains she buried here. Read more…


Vinapu Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Vinapu Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Vinapu

Vinapu is a ceremonial area where the remains of three platforms can be found, Ahu Tahira to the left, Ahu Vinapu right to the right, and a third one with almost no remains left that’s located within the island’s fuel tank area. Read more…


Te Pito Kura Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Te Pito Kura Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Te Pito Kura

Following the road on the north coast, facing a fishing cove in La Perouse Bay, Ahu Te Pito Kura can be found. This platform is intact and its moai lies in the position it was when it was knocked down by the Rapa Nui. Read more…


Papa Vaka Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Papa Vaka Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Papa Vaka

Papa Vaka is an archaeological site located on the island’s north road between Anakena and Ahu Te Pito Kura. It is characterized by its numerous petroglyphs (designs carved into rock) with motifs related to the sea and fishing. Read more…


Pu O Hiro Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Pu O Hiro Sitios arqueologicos de Isla de Pascua
Pu O Hiro

Located in the northern part of the coastal road, Pu o Hiro is a rock that’s about 1.25 meters tall whose name means “Hiro’s trumpet “, the ancient god of rain. Read more…


Map

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